making processes

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Works in Oil:

I'm looking forward to completing a new  body of oils that include more of the interactions, intersections  and feminist thought within each painting. 

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Art Making, Capturing the Maker's Attention

Making the art, often is for me, the artist, and not for others. Their enjoyment or engagement of the work is crucial but secondary.  


I find that smaller bodies of work, be it rock painting that can be completed in a short period of time, or larger bodies of work that takes months or years, such as oils, center me.  The viewer's enjoyment is secondary, but so important too in the maker's process.

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Works as Professional Painter

Painting as a process gives a lot of freedom yet at the same time challenges me. I like to push and pull where I go with painting. I like to include elements from the roles that I live such as wife, daughter, mother, artist, teacher, friend, while incorporating emotional content. 


Often this content is describe by the viewer as "cute, fun, or adorable." Initially,  I did not like these words to describe my work when I was a younger artist, but now I love them. The viewer is having an aesthetic response--and it brings them a bit of cheer. This to me, is not a bad thing!

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Skin, hair, Water, & Earth, a series of 50 watercolors

The Inspiration behind the series

The starting point for this series is skin--asking who's skin? what kind of skin? and what colors of skin? Starting with the epidermis of the pachyderm, my favorite animal, the elephant. 


 I did not give any limitations to myself other than the works have to be based in watercolor and fill a sheet. I was influenced by family, environments, travel, movies, strangers, conversations, dreams, stories, lived experiences and of course, love.


Each tells a story, each can stand alone as a work, but there are three min-series within the larger series. The first is called "Deaf Talk Within" and celebrates my relationships with the Deaf Community--my friends, Tim and Tie Brandow and their interpreter, Angela Burgett. The second is called "Victim-Survivor-Thriver" and through the use of forms that remind of all kinds of hair, I reflect on my own childhood sexual assault, and the process to become a thriver again. Learning once again, that I am so not alone in my lived experiences.Each painting, priced at $850.00 USD, is not framed. Framed works in this series are priced at $1,20o  

Learn More

This series is available for shows and for sale. Contact the artist for more information.

Find out more
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Why Skin, Hair Water and Earth, The Inspiration

Additional Information

The Inspiration behind the series


The  starting point for this series is skin--asking who's skin? what kind of  skin? and what colors of skin? Starting with the epidermis of the  pachyderm, my favorite animal, the elephant. 


 I  did not give any limitations to myself other than the works have to be  based in watercolor and fill a sheet. I was influenced by family,  environments, travel, movies, strangers, conversations, dreams, stories,  research, lived experiences and of course, love.


Each  painting tells a story, each can stand alone as a work, but there are three  min-series within the larger series of 50: The first is called "Deaf Talk  Within" and celebrates my relationships with the Deaf Community--my  friends, Tim and Tie Brandow and their interpreter, Angela Burgett. 


The  second is called "Victim-Survivor-Thriver" and through the use of forms  that remind of all kinds of hair, I reflect on my own violent childhood sexual  assault, moving from victim to survivor while encapsulating the process to become a thriver again. Learning once again, that I am so not alone in my lived experiences. Each painting, priced at  $950.00 USD, is not framed. The framed works in this series are priced at  $1,200.00 USD

Learn More

All 50 paintings will be on display the Week of October 14-18th, 2019 at the Edwin W. Zoller Gallery at Penn State University. 


The opening Reception will be from 5:30-7:30, Wednesday the 16th October, 2019

Studio Service

The Bindu School of Art

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Artists at the Bindu School of art are all adult survivors of leprosy. They learn to use black and white, then black and white paint. Finally, artists are introduced to the use of one color to complete monochromatic works and finally they are able to use red, yellow and blue with black and white. The variety of expression  from these artists is amazing and their works are for sale. 

Working with the Girls

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That's me in the center, assisting the girls with adding their hand prints in paint onto the wall. It was a busy, fun exciting project for them. 

The Red Fort, Agra, India

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To see the incredible architectural design, the details for cooling residents, the mind-blowing beauty was consciousness raising for me as I walked the grounds of the The Red Fort at Agra. Within patterns found there I noticed ancient symbols that are considered classic quilting patterns in the United States. 

Art and Well-being

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I am only 5'6 tall, but one can see how nutrition impacts growth. These wonderful women are artists at the the Bindu School of Art. Selling their art allows them to break the cycle of begging and creates a powerful sense of self. Being able to care for oneself and family through art making or work of any kind changes communities. These women are just great examples to me. THANK YOU!

The Peery School of Matriculation

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Rising Star Outreach works to eradicate leprosy, educate children of the leprosy-effected communities in India and provides medical mobile units to care for those in the leper colonies--among other important work in India. Being part of the changes there was life altering for me, effecting my professional and research practices, and transforming my art and meaning-making work.

Gratitude for our Bounty

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This photo and this artist, have been so motivational to me. Reminding me that we all have so much to share and offer to others, we each have stories to share and their is strength in that sharing. We must be thankful for the gifts, talents, and blessings we have in this life.


I also love this image as it shows the power of creating art, of making, and of never giving up. When was the last time you experienced this kind of tenacity in your life or with your creative processes?